Force production during escape responses: sequential recruitment of the phasic and tonic portions of the adductor muscle in juvenile sea scallop, Placopecten Magellanicus (gmelin)

Type Article
Date 2005-12
Language English
Author(s) Fleury Pierre-Gildas2, Janssoone Xavier1, Nadeau Madeleine3, Guderley Helga1
Affiliation(s) 1 : Univ Laval, Dept Biol, Quebec City, PQ G1K 7P4, Canada.
2 : IFREMER, Lab Environm Ressources, F-56470 La Trinite Sur Mer, France.
3 : Minist Agr Pecheries & Alimentat Quebec, Direct Rech Sci & Tech, Cap Aux Meules, PQ G0B 1B0, Canada.
Source Journal of Shellfish Research (0730-8000) (National Shellfisheries Association), 2005-12 , Vol. 24 , N. 4 , P. 905-911
WOS© Times Cited 26
Keyword(s) scallop, Placopecten magellanicus, tonic muscles, escape response, muscle contraction, force production
Abstract Giant scallops, Placopecten magellanicus, respond to the presence of starfish predators with an escape response consisting of a series of rapid valve adductions that allow the scallop to jump or swim away from the predator. To evaluate the coordination of the activity of the tonic and phasic muscles during such escape responses, we recorded their force production by attaching a force gauge to the shell of intact scallops and then stimulating the scallops with starfish. These recordings showed series of phasic contractions (claps) separated by prolonged tonic contractions. Numerous characteristics could be quantified from these recordings including the maximal force, mean force during the first minute, force, frequency and number of claps per series, as well as the force and duration of tonic contractions. The number of claps per series declined and the duration of the tonic contractions increased as the escape response continued. For most scallops, phasic and tonic contractions produced similar levels of force that changed little during the escape responses. The alternation between phasic and tonic contractions suggests that periods of tonic contraction allow the phasic muscle to recuperate and facilitate subsequent phasic contractions. Principal component analysis (PCA) confirmed the coordination between the phasic and tonic adductor muscles, because characteristics of each type of contraction, were closely associated. This method combines the advantages of stimulation of scallops by their predators with the simplicity of force gauge measurements. Force production during escape responses by individual scallops was highly reproducible, suggesting these measurements have considerable potential for tracking changes in the physiologic status of giant scallops.

Full Text
File Pages Size Access
publication-2449.pdf 7 1 MB Open access
Top of the page

How to cite 

Fleury Pierre-Gildas, Janssoone Xavier, Nadeau Madeleine, Guderley Helga (2005). Force production during escape responses: sequential recruitment of the phasic and tonic portions of the adductor muscle in juvenile sea scallop, Placopecten Magellanicus (gmelin). Journal of Shellfish Research, 24(4), 905-911. Open Access version : https://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00000/2449/