Understanding otolith biomineralization processes: new insights into microscale spatial distribution of organic and mineral fractions from Raman microspectrometry

Type Article
Date 2008-10
Language English
Author(s) Jolivet Aurelie1, Bardeau J.F.2, Fablet Ronan1, 3, Paulet Y.M.4, De Pontual HeleneORCID1
Affiliation(s) 1 : IFREMER, Lab Sclerochronol Animaux Aquat STH LASAA, ZI Pointe Diabel, F-29280 Plouzane, France.
2 : Univ Maine, Fac Sci, Lab Phys Etat Condense, F-72085 Le Mans 09, France.
3 : Inst Telecom Telecom Bretagne, LabSTICC, F-29238 Brest 03, France.
4 : Inst Univ Europeen Mer, CNRS, UMR 6539, LEMAR, F-29280 Plouzane, France.
Source Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry (1618-2642) (Springer), 2008-10 , Vol. 392 , N. 3 , P. 551-560
DOI 10.1007/s00216-008-2273-8
WOS© Times Cited 32
Keyword(s) Acid etching, Staining, Aragonite, L and D zones, Core
Abstract It is generally accepted that the formation of otolith microstructures (L- and D-zones) and in particular the organic and mineral fractions vary on a daily basis. Raman microspectrometry provides a nondestructive technique that can be used to provide structural information on organic and mineral compounds. We applied it to thin otolith sections of hake in order to address the following issues: (1) the simultaneous characterization of variations in the organic and mineral fractions both in the core area and along successive otolith microstructures; (2) elucidation of significant differences between these fractions; (3) quantification of the effects of etching and staining protocols on otolith structures. The primordium appeared as a punctual area depicting higher luminescence and greater concentrations in organic compounds containing CH groups. Sulcus side showed similar composition suggesting that the contact of the otolith with the macula and its orientation in otosac occur rapidly (about 10 days). The characterization of L- and D-zones in the opaque zones indicated that both structures contained organic and aragonitic fractions with cyclic and synchronous variations. Contrary to the results obtained after EDTA etching, L-zones depicted greater concentrations in organic compounds containing CH groups, whereas D-zones appear richer in aragonite. This organic fraction seemed to be revealed by Mutvei's staining and was affected by EDTA etching which suggests that it corresponds to the soluble fraction of organic matrix. Such results indicate that L- and D-zones differ in their respective organic constituents. Raman microspectrometry thus appears as a powerful technique to acquire quantitative information that is required for a better understanding of otolith biomineralization.
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Jolivet Aurelie, Bardeau J.F., Fablet Ronan, Paulet Y.M., De Pontual Helene (2008). Understanding otolith biomineralization processes: new insights into microscale spatial distribution of organic and mineral fractions from Raman microspectrometry. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 392(3), 551-560. Publisher's official version : https://doi.org/10.1007/s00216-008-2273-8 , Open Access version : https://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00000/4355/