Carbon conversion efficiency and population dynamics of a marine algae–bacteria consortium growing on simplified synthetic digestate: First step in a bioprocess coupling algal production and anaerobic digestion

Type Article
Date 2012-09
Language English
Author(s) Vasseur Christophe1, Bougaran GaelORCID2, Garnier MatthieuORCID2, Hamelin Jerome3, Leboulanger Christophe1, Le Chevanton Myriam2, Mostajir Behzad1, 4, Sialve Bruno5, Steyer Jean-Philippe3, Fouilland Eric1
Affiliation(s) 1 : Univ Montpellier I, IFREMER, Univ Montpellier 2, CNRS,IRD,SMEL,Lab Ecol Syst Marins Cotiers UMR 51, F-34200 Sete, France.
2 : IFREMER Ctr Nantes, Lab PBA, F-44311 Nantes, France.
3 : INRA, UR50, Lab Biotechnol & Environm, F-11100 Narbonne, France.
4 : Univ Montpellier 2, CNRS,MEDIMEER, Mediterranean Ctr Marine Ecosyst Expt Res,UMS 330, Ctr Ecol Marine Expt MEDIMEER,Stn Mediterraneenne, F-34200 Sete, France.
5 : Naskeo Environm, F-11100 Narbonne, France.
Source Bioresource Technology (0960-8524) (Elsevier Sci Ltd), 2012-09 , Vol. 119 , P. 79-87
DOI 10.1016/j.biortech.2012.05.128
WOS© Times Cited 37
Keyword(s) Optimization, Nannochloris, Heterotrophic bacteria, Anaerobic digestion, Bioenergy
Abstract Association of microalgae culture and anaerobic digestion seems a promising technology for sustainable algal biomass and biogas production. The use of digestates for sustaining the growth of microalgae reduces the costs and the environmental impacts associated with the substantial algal nutrient requirements. A natural marine algae–bacteria consortium was selected by growing on a medium containing macro nutrients (ammonia, phosphate and acetate) specific of a digestate, and was submitted to a factorial experimental design with different levels of temperature, light and pH. The microalgal consortium reached a maximum C conversion efficiency (i.e. ratio between carbon content produced and carbon supplied through light photosynthetic C conversion and acetate) of 3.6%. The presence of bacteria increased this maximum C conversion efficiency up to 6.3%. The associated bacterial community was considered beneficial to the total biomass production by recycling the carbon lost during photosynthesis and assimilating organic by-products from anaerobic digestion.

Highlights

► Carbon conversion efficiency of marine microalgae growing on a synthetic anaerobic digestate was 4%. ► Carbon conversion efficiency increased to 6.3% when bacteria were included into the carbon budget. ► Bacteria recycled the carbon lost during photosynthesis and originated from anaerobic digestion.
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Vasseur Christophe, Bougaran Gael, Garnier Matthieu, Hamelin Jerome, Leboulanger Christophe, Le Chevanton Myriam, Mostajir Behzad, Sialve Bruno, Steyer Jean-Philippe, Fouilland Eric (2012). Carbon conversion efficiency and population dynamics of a marine algae–bacteria consortium growing on simplified synthetic digestate: First step in a bioprocess coupling algal production and anaerobic digestion. Bioresource Technology, 119, 79-87. Publisher's official version : https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2012.05.128 , Open Access version : https://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00085/19642/