Hypoxia tolerance of common sole juveniles depends on dietary regime and temperature at the larval stage: evidence for environmental conditioning

Type Article
Date 2013-05
Language English
Author(s) Zambonino-Infante Jose-LuisORCID1, Claireaux Guy2, Ernande BrunoORCID3, Joli Aurelie2, Quazuguel PatrickORCID1, Severe Armelle1, Huelvan Christine1, Mazurais DavidORCID1
Affiliation(s) 1 : IFREMER, Unite Physiol Fonct Organismes Marins, LEMAR UMR 6539, F-29280 Plouzane, France.
2 : Univ Bretagne Occidentale, Inst Univ Europeen Mer, LEMAR UMR 6539, F-29280 Plouzane, France.
3 : IFREMER, Channel & North Sea Fisheries Unit, Fisheries Lab, F-62321 Boulogne, France.
Source Proceedings Of The Royal Society B-biological Sciences (0962-8452) (Royal Soc), 2013-05 , Vol. 280 , N. 1758 , P. -
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2012.3022
WOS© Times Cited 12
Note Electronic supplementary material is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2012.3022 or via http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org
Keyword(s) fish, environmental programming, climate change, hypoxia, nutrition
Abstract An individual's environmental history may have delayed effects on its physiology and life history at later stages in life because of irreversible plastic responses of early ontogenesis to environmental conditions. We chose a marine fish, the common sole, as a model species to study these effects, because it inhabits shallow marine areas highly exposed to environmental changes. We tested whether temperature and trophic conditions experienced during the larval stage had delayed effects on life-history traits and resistance to hypoxia at the juvenile stage. We thus examined the combined effect of global warming and hypoxia in coastal waters, which are potential stressors to many estuarine and coastal marine fishes. Elevated temperature and better trophic conditions had a positive effect on larval growth and developmental rates; warmer larval temperature had a delayed positive effect on body mass and resistance to hypoxia at the juvenile stage. The latter suggests a lower oxygen demand of individuals that had experienced elevated temperatures during larval stages. We hypothesize that an irreversible plastic response to temperature occurred during early ontogeny that allowed adaptive regulation of metabolic rates and/or oxygen demand with long-lasting effects. These results could deeply affect predictions about impacts of global warming and eutrophication on marine organisms.
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Zambonino-Infante Jose-Luis, Claireaux Guy, Ernande Bruno, Joli Aurelie, Quazuguel Patrick, Severe Armelle, Huelvan Christine, Mazurais David (2013). Hypoxia tolerance of common sole juveniles depends on dietary regime and temperature at the larval stage: evidence for environmental conditioning. Proceedings Of The Royal Society B-biological Sciences, 280(1758), -. Publisher's official version : https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2012.3022 , Open Access version : https://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00127/23858/