Dimethylsulfoniopropionate concentration in coral reef invertebrates varies according to species assemblages

Type Article
Date 2020-06
Language English
Author(s) Guibert Isis1, 2, 3, Bourdreux Flavien4, 5, Bonnard Isabelle6, Pochon Xavier7, 8, Dubousquet Vaimiti9, Raharivelomanana Phila10, Berteaux-Lecellier Véronique3, 11, Lecellier Gael4, 11
Affiliation(s) 1 : Swire Institute of Marine Science, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong S.A.R, China
2 : Sorbonne Université, UMR250/9220 ENTROPIE IRD-CNRS-UR-IFREMER-UNC, Promenade Roger-Laroque, Noumea cedex, New Caledonia, France
3 : USR3278 PSL CRIOBE CNRS-EPHE-UPVD, LabEx CORAIL, Papetoai, Moorea, French Polynesia
4 : Université de Paris-Saclay, UVSQ, 45 avenue des Etats-Unis, Versailles Cedex, France
5 : Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, UMR CNRS 8180, 45 avenue des Etats-Unis, Versailles Cedex, France
6 : USR3278 PSL CRIOBE CNRS-EPHE-UPVD, LabEx CORAIL, Université de Perpignan, 58 avenue Paul Alduy, 66860, Perpignan, France
7 : Coastal and Freshwater Group, Cawthron Institute, Private Bag 2, Nelson, 7042, New Zealand
8 : Institute of Marine Science, University of Auckland, Private Bag 349, Warkworth, 0941, New Zealand
9 : Délégation à la recherche, Government of French Polynesia BP 20981, 98713, Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia
10 : UMR 241 EIO, Université de la Polynésie Française, BP 6570 Faaa, 98702, Faaa, Tahiti, French Polynesia
11 : UMR250/9220 ENTROPIE IRD-CNRS-UR-IFREMER-UNC, Promenade Roger-Laroque, Noumea cedex, New Caledonia, France
Source Scientific Reports (2045-2322) (Springer Science and Business Media LLC), 2020-06 , Vol. 10 , N. 1 , P. 9922 (10p.)
DOI 10.1038/s41598-020-66290-5
WOS© Times Cited 2
Abstract

Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is a key compound in the marine sulfur cycle, and is produced in large quantities in coral reefs. In addition to Symbiodiniaceae, corals and associated bacteria have recently been shown to play a role in DMSP metabolism. Numerous ecological studies have focused on DMSP concentrations in corals, which led to the hypothesis that increases in DMSP levels might be a general response to stress. Here we used multiple species assemblages of three common Indo-Pacific holobionts, the scleractinian corals Pocillopora damicornis and Acropora cytherea, and the giant clam Tridacna maxima and examined the DMSP concentrations associated with each species within different assemblages and thermal conditions. Results showed that the concentration of DMSP in A. cytherea and T. maxima is modulated according to the complexity of species assemblages. To determine the potential importance of symbiotic dinoflagellates in DMSP production, we then explored the relative abundance of Symbiodiniaceae clades in relation to DMSP levels using metabarcoding, and found no significant correlation between these factors. Finally, this study also revealed the existence of homologs involved in DMSP production in giant clams, suggesting for the first time that, like corals, they may also contribute to DMSP production. Taken together, our results demonstrated that corals and giant clams play important roles in the sulfur cycle. Because DMSP production varies in response to specific species-environment interactions, this study offers new perspectives for future global sulfur cycling research.

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Supplementary data S2. 237 KB Open access
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Supplementary data S4. 13 KB Open access
Supplementary data S5. 10 MB Open access
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How to cite 

Guibert Isis, Bourdreux Flavien, Bonnard Isabelle, Pochon Xavier, Dubousquet Vaimiti, Raharivelomanana Phila, Berteaux-Lecellier Véronique, Lecellier Gael (2020). Dimethylsulfoniopropionate concentration in coral reef invertebrates varies according to species assemblages. Scientific Reports, 10(1), 9922 (10p.). Publisher's official version : https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-66290-5 , Open Access version : https://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00636/74777/