Mitigating Bycatch: Novel Insights to Multidisciplinary Approaches

Type Article
Date 2021-03
Language English
Author(s) Squires Dale1, Ballance Lisa T.2, Dagorn Laurent1, Dutton Peter H.3, Lent Rebecca4
Affiliation(s) 1 : NOAA Fisheries, Southwest Fisheries Sci Ctr, La Jolla, CA 92037 USA.
2 : Oregon State Univ, Marine Mammal Inst, Corvallis, OR 97331 USA.
3 : Inst Rech Dev IRD, UMR 248, MARBEC, Sete, France.
4 : Int Whaling Commiss, Cambridge, England.
Source Frontiers In Marine Science (2296-7745) (Frontiers Media Sa), 2021-03 , Vol. 8 , P. 613286 (19p.)
DOI 10.3389/fmars.2021.613285
WOS© Times Cited 1
Keyword(s) bycatch, biodiversity mitigation hierarchy, inter-disciplinary, conservation, regulation
Abstract

Fisheries bycatch conservation and management can be analyzed and implemented through the biodiversity mitigation hierarchy using one of four basic approaches: (1) private solutions, including voluntary, moral suasion, and intrinsic motivation; (2) direct or ?command-and-control? regulation starting from the fishery management authority down to the vessel; (3) incentive-or market-based to alter producer and consumer behavior and decision-making; and (4) hybrid of direct and incentive-based regulation through liability laws. Lessons can be learned from terrestrial and energy conservation, water management, forestry, and atmospheric pollution measures, such as the use of offsets, tradeable rights to externalities, and liability considerations. General bycatch conservation and management principles emerge based on a multidisciplinary approach and a wide array of private and public measures for incentivizing bycatch mitigation. ABSTRACT Bycatch refers most often to those species incidentally taken in fishing operations aimed at other (target) species. Bycatch in this paper refers to species accidentally caught other than the target species, brought on board, dead or alive, and that can therefore be either released alive, discarded dead, or landed. Bycatch can be other finfish (including undersized target species), protected species (fishes, sea turtles, marine mammals, and seabirds), live corals, or sponge reefs. We include habitat impact (Holland and Schnier, 2006; Driscoll et al., 2017) with bycatch (hereafter simply bycatch). Central to this paper is the fact that bycatch species and living habitats include vulnerable, threatened, endangered, protected or otherwise emblematic species for which the take should be minimized. Bycatch in this paper is extended to include habitat impact. ABSTRACT Fisheries bycatch conservation and management can be analyzed and implemented through the biodiversity mitigation hierarchy using one of four basic approaches: (1) private solutions, including voluntary, moral suasion, and intrinsic motivation; (2) direct or ?command-and-control? regulation starting from the fishery management authority down to the vessel; (3) incentive- or market-based to alter producer and consumer behavior and decision-making; and (4) hybrid of direct and incentive-based regulation through liability laws. Lessons can be learned from terrestrial and energy conservation, water management, forestry, and atmospheric pollution measures, such as the use of offsets, tradeable rights to externalities, and liability considerations. General bycatch conservation and management principles emerge based on a multidisciplinary approach and a wide array of private and public measures for incentivizing bycatch mitigation.

Full Text
File Pages Size Access
Publisher's official version 19 294 KB Open access
Top of the page