Shifts in bacterial community composition associated with increased carbon cycling in a mosaic of phytoplankton blooms

Type Article
Date 2016-01
Language English
Author(s) Landa Marine1, Blain Stephane1, Christaki Urania2, Monchy Sebastien2, Obernosterer Ingrid1
Affiliation(s) 1 : Univ Paris 06, Sorbonne Univ, CNRS, Lab Oceanog Microbienne LOMIC, Observ Oceanol, F-66650 Paris, France
2 : ULCO, CNRS, UMR 8187, INSU, LOG, Wimereux, France
Source Isme Journal (1751-7362) (Nature Publishing Group), 2016-01 , Vol. 10 , N. 1 , P. 39-50
DOI 10.1038/ismej.2015.105
WOS© Times Cited 92
Abstract

Marine microbes have a pivotal role in the marine biogeochemical cycle of carbon, because they regulate the turnover of dissolved organic matter (DOM), one of the largest carbon reservoirs on Earth. Microbial communities and DOM are both highly diverse components of the ocean system, yet the role of microbial diversity for carbon processing remains thus far poorly understood. We report here results from an exploration of a mosaic of phytoplankton blooms induced by large-scale natural iron fertilization in the Southern Ocean. We show that in this unique ecosystem where concentrations of DOM are lowest in the global ocean, a patchwork of blooms is associated with diverse and distinct bacterial communities. By using on-board continuous cultures, we identify preferences in the degradation of DOM of different reactivity for taxa associated with contrasting blooms. We used the spatial and temporal variability provided by this natural laboratory to demonstrate that the magnitude of bacterial production is linked to the extent of compositional changes. Our results suggest that partitioning of the DOM resource could be a mechanism that structures bacterial communities with a positive feedback on carbon cycling. Our study, focused on bacterial carbon processing, highlights the potential role of diversity as a driving force for the cycling of biogeochemical elements.

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Supplementary Table S4 1 39 KB Open access
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Supplementary References 4 41 KB Open access
Supplementary Figure S1 1 78 KB Open access
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Supplementary Figure S4 3 507 KB Open access
Supplementary Figure S5 1 88 KB Open access
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