Ecophysiological differences between vesicomyid species and metabolic capabilities of their symbionts influence distribution patterns of the deep‐sea clams

Type Article
Date 2019-06
Language English
Author(s) Cruaud Perrine1, 2, 3, Decker Carole4, Olu KarineORCID4, Arnaud-Haond SophieORCID4, 5, Papot Claire4, Le Baut Jocelyn4, Vigneron AdrienORCID1, 2, 3, Khripounoff AlexisORCID4, Gayet Nicolas4, Cathalot CecileORCID4, Caprais Jean-Claude4, Pignet Patricia1, 2, 3, Godfroy AnneORCID1, 2, 3, Cambon Bonavita Marie-AnneORCID1, 2, 3
Affiliation(s) 1 : IFREMER, Laboratoire de Microbiologie des Environnements Extrêmes UMR6197, Technopôle Brest Iroise Plouzané, France
2 : Laboratoire de Microbiologie des Environnements Extrêmes Université de Bretagne Occidentale, UMR6197 Plouzané ,France
3 : CNRS, Laboratoire de Microbiologie des Environnements Extrêmes UMR6197, Technopôle Brest Iroise Plouzané ,France
4 : IFREMER, Centre Bretagne, Laboratoire Environnement Profond REM-EEP‐LEP, Technopôle Brest Iroise Plouzané ,France
5 : MARBEC, Institut Français de Recherche pour L'Exploitation de la Mer Univ Montpellier, CNRS, IRD Sète ,France
Source Marine Ecology-an Evolutionary Perspective (0173-9565) (Wiley), 2019-06 , Vol. 40 , N. 3 , P. e12541 (16p.)
DOI 10.1111/maec.12541
WOS© Times Cited 1
Keyword(s) deep-sea ecosystems, Guaymas Basin, marine ecology, pliocardinae bivalve, sulfur storage, vesicomyid movements
Abstract

This study provides an analysis of vesicomyid bivalve–symbiont community distribution across cold seep and hydrothermal vent areas in the Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California, Mexico). Using a combination of morphological and molecular approaches including fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and electronic microscopy observations, vesicomyid clam species and their associated symbionts were characterized and results were analyzed in light of geochemical conditions and other on‐site observations. A greater diversity of vesicomyids was found at cold seep areas, where three different species were present (Phreagena soyoae [syn. kilmeri], Archivesica gigas, and Calyptogena pacifica). In contrast, A. gigas was the only species sampled across the hydrothermal vent area. The same haplotype of A. gigas was found in both hydrothermal vent and cold seep areas, highlighting possible contemporary exchanges among neighboring vents and seeps. In either ecosystem, molecular characterization of the symbionts confirmed the specificity between symbionts and hosts and supported the hypothesis of a predominantly vertical transmission. In addition, patterns of clams could reflect potential niche preferences for each species. The occurrence of numerous traces of vesicomyid movements on sediments in the sites colonized by A. gigas seemed to indicate that this species might have a better ability to move. Furthermore, variation in gill sulfur content could reveal a higher plasticity and sulfur storage capacity in A. gigas. Thus, the distribution of vesicomyid species across the chemosynthetic areas of the Guaymas Basin could be explained by differences in biological traits of the vesicomyid species that would allow A. gigas to more easily exploit transient and punctual sources of available sulfide than P. soyoae.

Full Text
File Pages Size Access
16 3 MB Access on demand
5 MB Access on demand
11 KB Access on demand
Author's final draft 40 2 MB Open access
Top of the page

How to cite 

Cruaud Perrine, Decker Carole, Olu Karine, Arnaud-Haond Sophie, Papot Claire, Le Baut Jocelyn, Vigneron Adrien, Khripounoff Alexis, Gayet Nicolas, Cathalot Cecile, Caprais Jean-Claude, Pignet Patricia, Godfroy Anne, Cambon Bonavita Marie-Anne (2019). Ecophysiological differences between vesicomyid species and metabolic capabilities of their symbionts influence distribution patterns of the deep‐sea clams. Marine Ecology-an Evolutionary Perspective, 40(3), e12541 (16p.). Publisher's official version : https://doi.org/10.1111/maec.12541 , Open Access version : https://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00493/60426/