Fish, Algae, and Oysters: The Winning Trio in Aquaculture

Type Article
Date 2019-11
Language English
Author(s) Roque D'Orbcastel Emmanuelle1, Boudin Elyse2, Li Meng3, 4, Carcaillet Frédérique2, Fouilland Eric5
Affiliation(s) 1 : MARBEC, University of Montpellier, IRD, Ifremer, CNRS, Sète, France
2 : MARBEC, University of Montpellier, IRD, Ifremer, CNRS, Montpellier, France
3 : Fisheries College, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China
4 : MARBEC, University of Montpellier, IRD, Ifremer, CNRS, Palavas-les-Flots, France
5 : MARBEC, University of Montpellier, IRD, Ifremer, CNRS, Sète, France
Source Frontiers for Young Minds (2296-6846) (Frontiers Media SA), 2019-11 , Vol. 7 , N. 131 , P. 7p.
DOI 10.3389/frym.2019.00131
Abstract

Most older methods of fish farming, or aquaculture, have focused on growing only a single species of sea life, for example, salmon. Modern aquaculture systems involve the cultivation of two or more species together, based on what happens normally in the food chain, so that one species can provide a source of food for another species in the farm. This article describes the results of an experiment combining fish culture with algae culture and oyster culture. We show that algae can grow using fish waste, and oysters can eat algae to produce good-quality, healthy food, which reduces the pollution generated by aquaculture.

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