Spiny lobster sounds can be detectable over kilometres underwater

Type Article
Date 2020-05
Language English
Author(s) Jézéquel Youenn1, Chauvaud Laurent2, Bonnel Julien3
Affiliation(s) 1 : Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Environnement Marin (LEMAR), UMR 6539 CNRS, UBO, IRD, Ifremer, Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer (IUEM), LIA BeBEST, rue Dumont D’Urville, 29280, Plouzané, France
2 : Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, Woods Hole, MA, 02543, USA
3 : Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Environnement Marin (LEMAR), UMR 6539 CNRS, UBO, IRD, Ifremer, Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer (IUEM), LIA BeBEST, rue Dumont D’Urville, 29280, Plouzané, France
Source Scientific Reports (2045-2322) (Springer Science and Business Media LLC), 2020-05 , Vol. 10 , N. 1 , P. 7943 (11p.)
DOI 10.1038/s41598-020-64830-7
WOS© Times Cited 2
Abstract

The detection ranges of broadband sounds produced by marine invertebrates are not known. To address this deficiency, a linear array of hydrophones was built in a shallow water area to experimentally investigate the propagation features of the sounds from various sizes of European spiny lobsters (Palinurus elephas), recorded between 0.5 and 100 m from the animals. The peak-to-peak source levels (SL, measured at one meter from the animals) varied significantly with body size, the largest spiny lobsters producing SL up to 167 dB re 1 µPa2. The sound propagation and its attenuation with the distance were quantified using the array. This permitted estimation of the detection ranges of spiny lobster sounds. Under the high ambient noise conditions recorded in this study, the sounds propagated between 5 and 410 m for the smallest and largest spiny lobsters, respectively. Considering lower ambient noise levels and different realistic propagation conditions, spiny lobster sounds can be detectable up to several kilometres away from the animals, with sounds from the largest individuals propagating over 3 km. Our results demonstrate that sounds produced by P. elephas can be utilized in passive acoustic programs to monitor and survey this vulnerable species at kilometre scale in coastal waters.

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