Rebound in functional distinctiveness following warming and reduced fishing in the North Sea

Type Article
Date 2021-01
Language English
Author(s) Murgier Juliette1, McLean Matthew2, Maire Anthony3, Mouillot David7, Loiseau Nicolas4, Munoz François5, Violle Cyrille6, Auber ArnaudORCID1
Affiliation(s) 1 : IFREMER, Unité Halieutique Manche Mer du Nord, Laboratoire Ressources Halieutiques, 150 quai Gambetta, BP699, 62321 Boulogne-sur-Mer, France
2 : Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2, Canada
3 : EDF R&D LNHE - Laboratoire National d’Hydraulique et Environnement, 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou, France
4 : MARBEC, Univ. Montpellier, CNRS, IFREMER, IRD, 34095 Montpellier Cedex, France
5 : University Grenoble-Alpes, LIPHY, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9, France
6 : CEFE, Univ. Montpellier, CNRS, EPHE, IRD, Univ. Paul Valéry Montpellier 3, Montpellier, France
7 : MARBEC, Univ. Montpellier, CNRS, IFREMER, IRD, 34095 Montpellier Cedex, France
Source Proceedings Of The Royal Society B-biological Sciences (0962-8452) (Royal Society of London), 2021-01 , Vol. 288 , N. 1942 , P. 20201600 (9p.)
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2020.1600
Keyword(s) functional diversity, ecological trait, fisheries, global change, ecosystem functioning, conservation
Abstract

Functionally distinct species (i.e. species with unique trait combinations in the community) can support important ecological roles and contribute disproportionately to ecosystem functioning. Yet, how functionally distinct species have responded to recent climate change and human exploitation has been widely overlooked. Here, using ecological traits and long-term fish data in the North Sea, we identified functionally distinct and functionally common species, and evaluated their spatial andtemporaldynamics in relation to environmental variables and fishing pressure. Functionally distinct specieswere characterized by late sexualmaturity, few, large offspring, and high parental care,many being sharks and skates that play critical roles in structuring food webs. Both functionally distinct and functionally common species increased in abundance as ocean temperatures warmed and fishing pressure decreased over the last three decades; however, functionally distinct species increased throughout the North Sea, but primarily in southern North Sea where fishing was historically most intense, indicating a rebound following fleet decommissioning and reduced harvesting. Yet, some of the most functionally distinct species are currently listed as threatened by the IUCN and considered highly vulnerable to fishing pressure. Alarmingly these species have not rebounded. This work highlights the relevance and potential of integrating functional distinctiveness into ecosystem management and conservation prioritization.

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How to cite 

Murgier Juliette, McLean Matthew, Maire Anthony, Mouillot David, Loiseau Nicolas, Munoz François, Violle Cyrille, Auber Arnaud (2021). Rebound in functional distinctiveness following warming and reduced fishing in the North Sea. Proceedings Of The Royal Society B-biological Sciences, 288(1942), 20201600 (9p.). Publisher's official version : https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2020.1600 , Open Access version : https://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00668/78019/