Sponge organic matter recycling: Reduced detritus production under extreme environmental conditions

Type Article
Date 2023-05
Language English
Author(s) Maggioni Federica1, 2, Bell James J.3, Pujo-Pay Mireille4, Shaffer Megan3, Cerrano Carlo5, Lemonnier HuguesORCID6, Letourneur Yves1, Rodolfo-Metalpa Riccardo1, 2
Affiliation(s) 1 : ENTROPIE, IRD, Université de la Réunion, CNRS, IFREMER, Université de Nouvelle-Calédonie, Nouméa 98800, New Caledonia
2 : Labex ICONA International CO2 Natural Analogues Network, JSPS, Japan
3 : School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington, New Zealand
4 : Sorbonne Université, CNRS, Laboratoire d'Océanographie Microbienne, LOMIC, F-66650 Banyuls-sur-Mer, France
5 : Department of Life and Environmental Sciences (DiSVA), Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy
6 : ENTROPIE, IRD, Université de la Réunion, CNRS, IFREMER, Université de Nouvelle-Calédonie, Nouméa 98800, New Caledonia
Source Marine Pollution Bulletin (0025-326X) (Elsevier BV), 2023-05 , Vol. 190 , P. 114869 (12p.)
DOI 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2023.114869
WOS© Times Cited 2
Keyword(s) Sponge loop, Organic matter recycling, Sponge metabolism, Extreme environments, Bourake?
Abstract

Sponges are a key component of coral reef ecosystems and play an important role in carbon and nutrient cycles. Many sponges are known to consume dissolved organic carbon and transform this into detritus, which moves through detrital food chains and eventually to higher trophic levels via what is known as the sponge loop. Despite the importance of this loop, little is known about how these cycles will be impacted by future environmental conditions. During two years (2018 and 2020), we measured the organic carbon, nutrient recycling, and photosynthetic activity of the massive HMA, photosymbiotic sponge Rhabdastrella globostellata at the natural laboratory of Bouraké in New Caledonia, where the physical and chemical composition of seawater regularly change according to the tide. We found that while sponges experienced acidification and low dissolved oxygen at low tide in both sampling years, a change in organic carbon recycling whereby sponges stopped producing detritus (i.e., the sponge loop) was only found when sponges also experienced higher temperature in 2020. Our findings provide new insights into how important trophic pathways may be affected by changing ocean conditions.

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How to cite 

Maggioni Federica, Bell James J., Pujo-Pay Mireille, Shaffer Megan, Cerrano Carlo, Lemonnier Hugues, Letourneur Yves, Rodolfo-Metalpa Riccardo (2023). Sponge organic matter recycling: Reduced detritus production under extreme environmental conditions. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 190, 114869 (12p.). Publisher's official version : https://doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2023.114869 , Open Access version : https://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00832/94398/